“Smoke Houses” by Eric Sloane, N.A..  This charmer is from Eric’s 1966 book “An Age of Barns”.  The book was a first for Eric Sloane in many ways, but the two most significant were that it was his first “coffee table” sized book, and it was arguably his first real tour de force in large, fully rendered pen and ink illustration.  As evident here, Eric could turn a seemingly mundane aspect of early American vernacular architecture (anything from outhouses to smoke houses!) into a fascinating, entertaining, educational, and charming drawing.  Interestingly, Eric almost always created illustrations to size, meaning that he had a good idea of how much space on a page he would have on a finished, published book, and worked his drawings to that size.  One of the aspects of illustrations I love from An Age of Barns is that they are all large, much larger than the finished space they occupy in the published book.  Whether Eric was ensuring that the published drawings retained a higher level of detail – or if the original idea was to print An Ag of Barns in a larger size (or both) – his pen and ink illustrations created for the book are magnificent.  Note also the incorporation of a lined and signed mat.

Eric Sloane painting at his easel

Over the course of his career, Eric Sloane painted many murals.  Quite a few were in private homes, many others were in corporate settings.  These photographs were taken by Wil Mauch in 1999/2000 of a Sloane mural in the headquarters of the now defunct International Silver Company in Meriden, Connecticut.  

     Photos from Wil Mauch’s Aware: A Retrospective of the Life and Work of Eric Sloane. You can learn more about this most fascinating of American, as well as order the Aware biography with proceeds going to the Friends of the Eric Sloane Museum, by visiting www.weatherhillfarm.com. 

    

Earth Flight Environment by Eric Sloane

Some great photographs can be found at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Collections Division.  The photographs show the finished version of Eric Sloane’s Earth Flight Environment as well as some images of the artist at work.  I did not realize that there is another Eric Sloane mural, hidden currently behind a wall, in the Age of Flight section of the museum.  From the photograph, it looks like a great mural.  Has anyone seen it in person?

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An image from the current exhibit The Artist Who Loved the Sky:  Cloudscapes, Weather, and the World of Eric Sloane, which will close October 3rd.  This wonderful exhibit chronicles Eric’s work with the sky and meteorology with a specific emphasis on his original art.  Some early and rare original works of art are included in this exhibit.

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An image from the current exhibit The Artist Who Loved the Sky:  Cloudscapes, Weather, and the World of Eric Sloane, which will close October 3rd.  This wonderful exhibit chronicles Eric’s work with the sky and meteorology with a specific emphasis on his original art.  Some early and rare original works of art are included in this exhibit.

Artist at Work

art42Another early photograph at the artist at work. Here Eric Sloane is examining a finished “cloudscape”, a term he claimed to coin for his paintings of just the sky with perhaps a plane flying through the cloud formations. From the photographers perspective, this cloudscape appears quite large, though not uncommon for the period.